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  • Washington State Patrol pilots successfully test special laser eye protection developed at Wright-Patterson Lab

    Aiming a laser at an aircraft is a federal crime that can net offenders up to five years in jail or cost them a $250,000 fine. Even with this heavy potential penalty, laser strikes have become increasingly more common. According to the FAA, 6,852 such incidents were reported in 2020, compared with 385 in 2006, and so far this year, incidents of “joy lasing” are up 20 percent over last year. Cheap and easily obtained, hand-held lasers used as pointers and cat toys are certainly harmless when used as intended. But when they are aimed at the cockpit of an aircraft, they can temporarily blind the pilot — with possibly deadly consequences.
  • AFRL Materials scientist receives NextFlex 2021 Fellow Award

    Dr. Jeremy Ward, a scientist at Wright-Patterson’s Air Force Research Laboratory, has received a 2021 Fellow Award from NextFlex, America’s Flexible Hybrid Electronics (FHE) Manufacturing Institute. Ward was one of four recipients.
  • Testing done at AFRL made Perseverance and the search for life on Mars possible

    On February 18, 2021, NASA’s rover Perseverance touched down on the surface of Mars to begin searching for evidence of past life. The success of this touchdown would not have been possible without the work of a team of researchers who operate unique erosion testing equipment in a windowless bunker at Wright-Patterson’s Air Force Research Lab. And this is not the only Dayton connection to this particular Mars mission.
  • Team from Air Force Research Lab finds a way to use packaged snow as explosion protection

    In March 2021, a team from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base’s Junior Force Warfighter Operations in the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate (designated “JFWORX”) led a collaborative, live-fire test with explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) personnel from the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Because the extreme cold of Alaskan winters often makes standard ordnance disposal procedures inadequate if not impossible, JFWORX was asked to formally evaluate the use of a readily available resource — snow — as a protective barrier between live ordnance and people or property or both.
  • Air Force Research Laboratory engineer receives Vaught Visionary Leadership Award

    Ms. Diane Buhrmaster, Coatings Technology Team Lead for AFRL’s Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, has received the 2020 Brigadier General Wilma Vaught Visionary Leadership Award in the Civilian Category. This annual award was created in honor of General Vaught for her outstanding service and dedication to the Air Force and the nation. It is presented to an officer (O-6 and below), enlisted person (E-9 and below) and a civilian (GS-15 and below) to recognize that individual’s visionary leadership, innovative efforts and beneficial effect on the U.S. Air Force.
  • AFRL approves Cooperative Research and Development Agreement for silicon photonics

    The Air Force Research Laboratory recently approved a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between its Nanoelectronic Materials Branch and Iris Light Technologies. The collaboration will be working to develop hybrid silicon lasers. Sometimes called the “holy grail of optoelectronics,” these miniature lasers are part of a broader field of technology known as silicon photonics.
  • AFRL researchers demonstrate record-breaking RF isolator performance in ultra-compact device

    As the USAF continues with the unrelenting pursuit of driving down the size, weight and power of radio frequency (RF) components, the inherent challenges in these types of technologies are compounded. The typical difficulties of making smaller mechanical and physical components, however, are dwarfed by the challenges posed by making the required onboard electronic equipment smaller, lighter, and less power-hungry.
  • AFRL partners with Cornell to use micro-beam scanning technology for inspecting composite materials

    The Air Force research Laboratory, in partnership with the Materials Solutions Network at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) of Cornell University, has developed a tool that can look directly inside of and instantaneously inspect the structure of composite components while they are being manufactured. This new technology uses a combination of phase contrast imaging and micro-beam scanning to produce real-time X-ray scattering images of the component during and post production. The process is expected to save the Air Force millions of dollars in qualification and certification of composite parts used in advanced unmanned aerial vehicles and satellite systems.
  • AFRL launches collaborative biosensor effort to detect stress and fatigue biomarkers

    The Air Force Research Laboratory recently kicked off a $2M partnership with Case Western Reserve University. The joint project will accelerate biosensor development, with an emphasis on the detection of biomarkers for stress and fatigue.
  • Newly-acquired AFRL test aircraft to aid personnel recovery research

    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – A small aircraft that is poised to make a big impact on military personnel recovery made a brief stop in the Dayton, Ohio, area on its way to St. Mary’s County, Maryland, where it will be used to test the Air Force Research Laboratory-developed Low Altitude Sensing Helmet system.On Dec. 21, 2020, the
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